Education

Education

The education programs offered at Nashville State Community College are organized by the age/grade level or specialty area in which the student would like to teach. To become a certified, licensed teacher who desires to teach in public schools, a four-year degree is required.

Students begin by meeting with their advisor to plan their Nashville State courses, ensuring they match the course requirements of the four-year university teacher education program of their choice.

Nashville State provides the first steps toward a career in teaching by offering degree programs designed to meet the first two years of a four-year teacher education program.

  • Early Childhood Education: Associate degrees and technical certificate for students who wish to care for and teach children from infancy through third grade. This includes preparation for those who work in child care as well as those who seek teaching license. See Early Childhood Education for complete information.
     
  • Elementary Education: Associate of Science degree program for students who wish to become a licensed teacher of children from grades kindergarten through sixth grade. The K-6 Elementary Education Associate of Science in Teaching degree program is also offered.
     
  • Middle Grades Education: Associate of Science degree program for students who plan to become licensed teachers in middle grades education and teach children in grades four through eight.
     
  • Secondary Education: Associate of Arts/Associate of Science degree program for students who plan to become licensed teachers in grades seven through twelve.
     
  • Special Education: Associate of Science degree program for students who plan to become licensed teachers in special education and teach children with special needs in grades pre-k through twelve.

Elementary Education Associate of Science

AS Elementary Education Advising Sheet *

The Associate of Science (AS) degree with an emphasis in Elementary Education is designed for the student who desires to work with elementary students in kindergarten through sixth grade. The graduate will have completed 60 hours of coursework that is comparable to the freshman and sophomore years of college. This degree recommends the same course of study as the Associate of Science in Teaching (AST) K-6 Elementary Education degree but does NOT have the three extra requirements that are part of the the AST degree.

The Elementary Education AS degree is best suited for the following students:

  • Those who plan to transfer to a non-TBR school.
  • Those who have course work that differs from the required courses of the AST (K-6).
  • Those who do not complete the extra requirements of the AST (K-6).

Math Requirements for Elementary Education Majors
Math is an essential part of the educational program for elementary education majors and is one of the areas tested in the CORE series. For information about MATH 1410 - Math for Elementary Education I and MATH 1420 - Math for Elementary Education II, see the course descriptions in the NSCC Catalog.

Other Requirements

  • All education majors must develop a portfolio. A professional portfolio is a collection of work products (such as written papers and videotapes of teaching) from the course of a teacher-preparation program. Instructions for compiling the portfolio can be found by clicking Professional Portfolio below.
  • Passage of the CORE series or a score of 22 on the ACT are standard requirements for entrance to teacher education programs, which usually begin at the first semester of the junior year. Students seeking an Associate of Science in Teaching must have a 22 on the ACT or pass all three CORE subtests in order to earn the degree.
  • Passage of the Disposition Assessment is a required component of an Associate of Science in Teaching Degree.
  • A background check will be required of all students prior to entering the teacher education program at a four-year university.

Grading Policy for Education Majors
A grade of “C” or above must be earned in all education courses prior to graduation.

* These recommended courses will assist students in planning and selecting courses each semester. Students are urged to contact their Nashville State advisor as soon as possible and to consult the catalog of their transferring institution for specific course requirements.
 

K-6 Elementary Education Associate of Science in Teaching

AST K-6 Elementary Education Advising Sheet *

The K-6 Elementary Education Associate of Science in Teaching (AST) is a transfer degree program designed for students who wish to pursue a career teaching children in kindergarten through sixth grade in public and private schools. The graduate with a K-6 Elementary Education AST degree will have completed the first two years of a four-year degree required for teacher certification in elementary education in Tennessee.

The K-6 Elementary Education AST graduate will be prepared to enter the four-year university at the junior level and be prepared to enter the university’s teacher preparation program as all coursework will transfer.

In addition to completion of 60 hours of college coursework, the K-6 Elementary Education AST degree has further requirements which correspond to the four-year universities’ requirements for entrance into the teacher preparation program:

  • 2.75 GPA
  • Passing score on the Disposition Assessment
  • Passage of all three subtests of the CORE Exam or a score of 22 on the ACT.

The K-6 Elementary Education AST is recommended as the degree of choice for those planning to transfer to one of the Tennessee Board of Regents universities.

Please see the NSCC Catalog for more information about the K-6 Elementary Education AST degree program.

* The course requirements of the K-6 Elementary Education AST degree should be followed explicitly as the student makes course selections each semester. Students are urged to contact their advisor for assistance.
 

Middle Grades Education Associate of Science

AS Middle Grades Education Advising Sheet

The Middle Grades (4th through 8th) Education graduate will be prepared to enter the four-year university teacher education program of their choice at the junior level. In planning the courses to be taken at Nashville State, students should do the following:

  • Choose the four-year university that they plan to attend.
  • Meet with their Nashville State advisor to match up the courses offered at Nashville State with the courses required at their future four-year university.

In addition to completion of 60 hours of college coursework, the Middle Grades Education degree has further requirements which correspond to requirements for entrance into four-year university teacher preparation programs:

  • 2.75 GPA
  • Passing score on the Disposition Assessment
     

Secondary Education Associate of Science/Associate of Arts

AS/AA Secondary Education Advising Sheet *

The Secondary Education Associate of Science (AS) or Associate of Arts (AA) degree focuses on completing the first two years of a four-year college program. The 60 total credit hours of coursework for the Secondary Education AS or AA degree* is comparable to the freshmen and sophomore years of study. Forty-one of these hours are general education courses and 19 hours are in the secondary education area of emphasis.

In planning the courses to be taken at Nashville State, students should do the following:

  • Decide which content area that they would like to teach, such as English, foreign languages, math, science, history, etc.
  • Choose the four-year university that they plan to attend.
  • Meet with their Nashville State advisor to match up the courses offered at Nashville State with the courses required at their future four-year university.

* Foreign language courses are an additional requirement for the AA degree.
 

Special Education Associate of Science

AS Special Education Advising Sheet

The Special Education Associate of Science (AS) degree focuses on completing the first two years of a four-year college program. The 60 total credit hours of coursework for the Special Education AS degree is comparable to the freshmen and sophomore years of study. Forty-one of these hours are general education courses and 19 hours are in the special education area of emphasis.

In planning the courses to be taken at Nashville State, students should do the following:

  • Decide which content area that they would like to teach, such as English, foreign languages, math, science, history, etc.
  • Choose the four-year university that they plan to attend.
  • Meet with their Nashville State advisor to match up the courses offered at Nashville State with the courses required at their future four-year university.
     

CORE Testing

Passage of the CORE series or a score of 22 on the ACT are standard requirements for entrance to teacher education programs which usually begin at the first semester of the junior year.

At Nashville State, Elementary Education majors are encouraged to take the CORE test TWO semesters prior to graduation (in the same semester that a student would file the Intent to Graduate form). NOTE: Students working toward an Associate of Science in Teaching Degree are required to take the CORE unless they have a 22 on the ACT test.

It is strongly recommended that the math portion of the CORE should be taken after completion of MATH 1410 - Math for Elementary Education I.

For information on pricing, locations for testing, and registration, see the Educational Testing Service (ETS) website: www.ets.org/praxis/about/core/
 

Disposition Assessment

NSCC Disposition Assessment Form and Cover Letter

Every Associate of Science in Teaching (AST) degree candidate will undergo a Disposition Assessment. The purpose of the Disposition Assessment is to provide information about the student’s attitudes and skills that are deemed necessary to be a successful teacher.

The following are the areas that will be assessed:

Collaboration
1. Candidate contributes to group/class activities that promote learning and improve relationships.
2. Candidate collaborates with others to discover and/or solve problems.
Communication
3. Candidate communicates effectively with others (visually, orally, written).
4. Candidate actively listens and responds appropriately to others.
Scholarship
5. Candidate demonstrates enthusiasm for the discipline/subject matter.
6. Candidate seeks information and engages in discussion about discipline.
Respect
7. Candidate shows respect for diverse needs, interests, and talents of others.
8. Candidate shows sensitivity to community and cultural norms.
Responsibility
9. Candidate provides effective leadership.
10. Candidate completes class requirements accurately and on time.
11. Candidate accepts and carries out professional activities in timely fashion.
12. Candidate accepts responsibility for own actions.
13. Candidate performs appropriately under stressful conditions.
Reflection
14. Candidate evaluates the effects of choices and action on self and others.
15. Candidate assesses and responds constructively to suggestions.

Successful passage of the disposition assessment will be measured by aggregating scores on the Disposition Assessment Form of three professional educators of the student's choice. Once person from each of these categories will make up the review panel:

  • Nashville State Education faculty that taught the student in one of the three education courses: EDUC 2010 - Introduction to Teaching, EDUC 2110 - Educational Psychology, EDUC 2120 - Intro to Special Education
  • Nashville State general education faculty that taught the student in one course in the general education core (English, humanities/fine arts, math, social sciences, history, science)
  • An educator from a public or private school system (grades Pre-K to 12) who has knowledge of the student
     

Education Professional Portfolio

Education Professional Portfolio Instructions

All education majors must develop a professional portfolio. A professional portfolio is a collection of work products (such as written papers and videos of teaching) from the course of a teacher-preparation program.

The professional portfolio will be begun in EDUC 2010 - Introduction to Teaching. Documents will be added throughout the student’s educational career. All documents developed at Nashville State should be saved electronically so that they can be entered into the electronic portfolio system used by the student’s four-year transfer university of choice.
 

Background Check

Teacher candidates are required to have a background check in order to enter schools and work with children. Students who desire to pursue a teaching career should initiate the process upon graduation from Nashville State. The letter of explanation from TBR and the directions will provide instructions about this process:

Background Check Instructions
 

Tennessee Professional Education Standards

All prospective teachers must complete coursework in professional education. Nashville State offers four of the courses that are in the professional education core: EDUC 2010 - Introduction to Teaching, EDUC 2110 - Educational Psychology, EDUC 2120 - Intro to Special Education, EDUC 2200 - Instructional Technology. Students earning the Associate of Science in Teaching (AST) degree will have met the course requirements at their four-year transfer university of choice in the courses that are similar to these four courses.

Teaching is a lifelong process that is begun with the coursework at Nashville State. The initial portfolio, the observations and field work experiences are the beginning of the educational experiences that lead to being a professional/licensed teacher.

The course work and field experiences are designed to help the student meet the necessary knowledge and skills that are considered essential to be a teacher and work with the wide variety of students in Tennessee’s schools.

The following are the eleven standards that outline the knowledge and skills required of teacher earning licensure in Tennessee. These are based on the NCATE and INTASC standards—national organizations focusing on teacher education.

Standard 1: Discipline Taught. Candidates know, understand, and use the central concepts, tools of inquiry and structures of the discipline(s) they teach and can create learning experiences that develop student competency the subject matter.
Standard 2: Student Learning and Development. Candidates understand how students learn and develop and provide learning opportunities that support student intellectual, social and personal development.
Standard 3: Diverse Learners. Candidates understand how students differ in their approaches to learning and create instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.
Standard 4: Teaching Strategies. Candidates understand and use a variety of instructional strategies to encourage development of critical thinking, problem solving and performance skills in students.
Standard 5: Learning Environment. Candidates use an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning and self-motivation.
Standard 6: Communication. Candidates use knowledge of effective verbal, nonverbal and media communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration and supportive interaction in the classroom.
Standard 7: Planning. Candidates plan instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students, the community, and curriculum goals.
Standard 8: Assessment and Evaluation. Candidates know, understand and use formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuing intellectual, social and physical development of the learner.
Standard 9: Reflective Practitioner. Candidates are reflective practitioners who continually evaluate the effects of their choices and actions on others (students, parents and other professionals in the learning community) and who actively seek out opportunities to grow professionally.
Standard 10: Colleagues, Parents, and Community. Candidates foster relationships with school colleagues, parents and agencies in the larger community to support students' learning and wellbeing.
Standard 11A: Technology. Candidates use technology and technology based resources to facilitate developmentally appropriate student learning.
Standard 11B: Technology. Candidates use technology to enhance their professional growth and productivity.
Standard 11C: Technology. Candidates effectively use and manage all technology available to them and explore uses of emerging resources. They promote the equitable, ethical and legal use of technology resources.
 

 

Program Faculty

Cristina Cottom, Education Programs Coordinator, Instructor, 615-353-3359
Cristina CottomCristina began her career in education with Metro Nashville Public Schools as an ESL instructor, technology coach, parent involvement coordinator, and Title I facilitator. She taught at Liberty University and Virginia Western Community College before joining Nashville State Community College, initially teaching education and ESL classes before becoming the Education program coordinator. Cristina is currently completing her Ed.D in Curriculum and Instruction.

Education
Ed.S, Curriculum and Instruction, Liberty University, 2012
Master of Arts in Teaching, English Language Learners, Lipscomb University, 2008
Bachelor of Music in Commercial Voice, Belmont University, 2006
 


Amy Davis, Associate Professor, 615-353-3519
Amy DavisAmy has comprehensive experience working with young children in public schools. Through her time in public schools, Amy taught pre-k, kindergarten, and first grade. As part of a pilot program for universal preschool in Louisiana, she co-led a model class for mainstreaming special need preschoolers. Amy has also served on advisory committees for implementing preschools in public schools. As a teacher, she designed and implemented parenting clubs, mentored colleagues, supervised preservice teachers in preschool programs, led professional development workshops, and served on curriculum teams. Amy has twice been awarded Teacher of the Year by her colleagues. She has been on the faculty at Nashville State since 2007.

Education
Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education, Mississippi State University, 1999
Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction, University of Mississippi, 2001
Early Childhood Add-On Certification, Nunez Community College, 2003


Nancy Ledbetter, Associate Professor, 615-353-3616
Nancy LedbetterNancy has over 30 years diverse experience as a preschool teacher, home visitor administrator, college instructor, CDA advisor, and early childhood consultant. As a teacher, Nancy has taught 4-year-olds, young toddlers, and children with special needs. She has been a director of three early education programs: a parent-cooperative child care, a inner-city community-based early education program, and a corporate-sponsored, hospital-based child care program. Two of these early childhood programs received national accreditation from NAEYC while under her leadership. She joined the faculty of Nashville State in 2000.

Education
Bachelor of Science in Childhood Development and Family Relations, University of Tennessee at Knoxville, 1972
Tennessee Teacher Certification Grades K-8, 1974
Master of Science Psychology Childhood Development Specialist, Peabody College of Vanderbilt University, 1979
PITC Certified Trainer for Program for Infant and Toddler Caregivers (Modules I, II, III, & IV), 2000


Peggy Sharpe, Associate Professor, 615-353-3365
Peggy SharpePeggy has taught Early Childhood Education at the college level since 1991. She was the coordinator of the program at a community college in Ohio before moving to Nashville in 2001 and joining the faculty at Nashville State. Besides developing and teaching the courses for the community college in Ohio, she and her husband started a non-profit organization. That organization has grown to include two child care centers and three before- and after-school sites. Peggy is also a consultant and trainer, providing training sessions to help improve quality at early childhood centers.

Education
Bachelor of Science in Home Economics, Harding University, 1967
Master of Science in Childhood Development and Family Life, Ohio University, 1989
 

Education Resources for Students

 

 

Contact Information

E-mail: ElementaryEducation@nscc.edu
Program Office: 615-353-3347

Cristina Cottom, Program Coordinator
Phone: 615-353-3359

Campus Directory

NSCC Catalog

See NSCC Catalog for program requirements, recommended schedules, course descriptions and syllabi.

Class Schedule

See Class Schedule for course availability.

Marissa, Education

I love the smaller classes. It makes it more personal and I feel like I'm getting the most out of my education.

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Scott, Education

I enjoy the smaller classroom environments here at Nashville State. I get my questions answered right away and we can have conversations instead of lectures.

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Danielle, Education

I really enjoy my psychology class and my instructor’s way of teaching. Through discussion, we are developing our critical thinking skills.

Danielle, Education

Angel, Business

College is not only for people who made straight A's in high school. If you really want to better yourself, Nashville State will help you.

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April, Social Work

When I began college, my goal was to reach my full potential as a human being. Nashville State has advanced my knowledge, critical thinking skills, and self accountability.

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